Patrick Reed to Captain US Ryder Cup Team No Time Soon

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There is no “I” in team and there is no “I” in Reed, but golfer Patrick Reed might be considering changing the spelling of his name to Reid in order to get the first person pronoun prominently displayed to match his personality.

He would no doubt choose to spell in ReId.

Reed has been known to be outspoken at times, as he was several years back, when after winning for the first time on the US PGA Tour, he rather brazenly told the TV reporter and the audience that he would soon be ranked in the top five of the Official World Golf Rankings.

Reed, demonstrating what has to be the exact opposite of “Team Player,” was not reticent about expressing his disagreement with the way Jim Furyk ran the 2018 Ryder Cup pairings.

He told the New York Times that he wanted to be paired with Jordan Spieth, but it turned out that Spieth did not want to play with him.

Reed lost twice in pairs play when teamed with Tiger Woods and based on Woods’ Ryder Cup record, being teamed with Tiger is a veritable kiss of death. Reed won his singles match, but by the time he did that, the Europe team was well into the bubbly.

Both the losses by Reed and Woods were to Francesco Molinari, a one-time winner on the US PGA Tour, and Tommy Fleetwood, who has never won in the US, although he is in our opinion, the coolest player in the game.

Spieth was paired with his good mate Justin Thomas. They were the lone bright spot for the American squad, winning three of their four matches together.

An anonymous, non-playing member of the US Team reported that Reed, “…begged to play with Tiger.”

Furyk actually sent Reed and Woods to the bench for one session. When they got on next day, Reed spent more time drowning golf balls than he did draining putts.

According to the source, “He (Reed) totally screwed Tiger. He has no clue how to play team golf. I saw firsthand how bad of a team player he was. Eleven players understood the concept of team golf and only one didn’t. Unfortunately, that one proved to be too costly for the team to overcome.”

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